Beanpole - Expat Cinema Rotterdam
Kantemir Balagov
Miss seeing international films because you can’t yet keep up with the Dutch subtitles? Want to meet fellow expats and new Dutch folks? Love cinema? Then this is the event for you! Curated international films with English subtitles & meetup drinks afterwards.

Two tenacious women in the post-siege ruins of 1945 Leningrad struggle to rebuild their lives, in Kantemir Balagov’s loose adaptation of Nobel Prize–winning author Svetlana Alexievich’s The Unwomanly Face of War.

It’s 1945, and Leningrad lies in ruins, wartorn and paralyzed. Iya (Viktoria Miroshnichenko), a nurse, and Masha (Vasilisa Perelygina), a soldier, are traumatized from the siege and its aftermath, and struggling to rebuild their lives. The Russian title of Kantemir Balagov’s Beanpole, Dylda, suggests an awkwardness and lack of grace that is mirrored in the setting’s bombed-out streets, smashed tenements, and hospitals full of limbless veterans — and in its hapless yet tenacious protagonists.

A former student of Alexander Sokurov, Balagov broke onto the scene in 2017 with his debut feature Closeness, which competed in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard, where it won the FIPRESCI prize. Beanpole — produced by Alexander Rodnyansky, who was also behind Andrey Zvyangintsev’s Elena, Leviathan, and Loveless — won both Best Director and FIPRESCI in this year’s Un Certain Regard in Cannes.

Deze voorstelling heeft al plaatsgevonden
  • Film
Rusland
2019
134’
Russian gesproken
English ondertiteld
12 Angst
Miss seeing international films because you can’t yet keep up with the Dutch subtitles? Want to meet fellow expats and new Dutch folks? Love cinema? Then this is the event for you! Curated international films with English subtitles & meetup drinks afterwards.

Two tenacious women in the post-siege ruins of 1945 Leningrad struggle to rebuild their lives, in Kantemir Balagov’s loose adaptation of Nobel Prize–winning author Svetlana Alexievich’s The Unwomanly Face of War.

It’s 1945, and Leningrad lies in ruins, wartorn and paralyzed. Iya (Viktoria Miroshnichenko), a nurse, and Masha (Vasilisa Perelygina), a soldier, are traumatized from the siege and its aftermath, and struggling to rebuild their lives. The Russian title of Kantemir Balagov’s Beanpole, Dylda, suggests an awkwardness and lack of grace that is mirrored in the setting’s bombed-out streets, smashed tenements, and hospitals full of limbless veterans — and in its hapless yet tenacious protagonists.

A former student of Alexander Sokurov, Balagov broke onto the scene in 2017 with his debut feature Closeness, which competed in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard, where it won the FIPRESCI prize. Beanpole — produced by Alexander Rodnyansky, who was also behind Andrey Zvyangintsev’s Elena, Leviathan, and Loveless — won both Best Director and FIPRESCI in this year’s Un Certain Regard in Cannes.

Logo Expat Cinema LantarenVenster RotterdamFilmposter Beanpole